Tuesday, August 04, 2009

Dry Mouth

Good morning, Ellie

An observation: I woke up in the middle of the night with a dry mouth and decided to get up and get some
Zellies. I put two in my mouth, went back to bed, and almost an hour later they still hadn't completely dissolved. Is this typical or does it mean that my mouth was extremely dry? I wear a night guard for bruxism, but sleep with my mouth closed.

There's no harm in going back to bed with
Zellies in your mouth, right? There's no way that that kind of "long term" exposure can cause any problems, is there? (I would never go to sleep with any food or drink residue other than water in my mouth because I know that that can wreak havoc with your oral health.)

Can this p.m. dry mouth that I apparently have be the cause of my jaw bone loss and receding gums? My mouth is very clean: excellent home care, no debris at dental cleanings, no inflammation, etc. During the day I have been noticing that my mouth feels dry as well (I'm guessing that it's due to hormonal changes, as I'm almost fifty.) I eat
Zellies all the time and have also started to sip water with xylitol dissolved in it throughout the day. Part of me worries that it's like sipping sugar water all day, even though intellectually I know that xylitol doesn't have the same effect on your mouth as sugar.

I keep searching for answers. I've been following your
Complete Mouth Care System since June 1 (just at night for starters; my dentist has strong concerns about Listerine eroding soft tissue in some people, therefore my hesitation.) I dilute the Listerine 50:50 with water and swish for 30 seconds. Am I deriving any benefit from the Listerine by doing this?

I appreciate your generosity in answering my many questions!

Thank you very much, again!


-LH


Hi LH,

You sound as if you have an extremely dry mouth which Zellies will certainly help. Zellies are made from 100 percent xylitol and protect teeth In fact, xylitol is so protective of teeth, one company now makes an adhesive, slow dissolving tablet called XyliMelt (it is like a bigger Zellies tablet) for special needs patients to stick on their teeth so that the xylitol will slowly dissolve and stay in the mouth for as long as possible. Dissolving xylitol in water to sip during the day and night is a great idea. The benefits of xylitol are enhanced the more often you have some nibbling xylitol/Zellies is the perfect way to enjoy oral health!

Loss of gums and bone loss can be stopped. I don't know what you are using to clean your teeth but I would be very careful NEVER to use baking soda in your mouth. Baking soda can often cause horrible gum recession.Also, I would suggest my Complete Mouth Care System since it will get rid of gum problems and protect teeth so I am glad you started using it. If you are following the instructions you rinse the Listerine off your teeth with the ACT. I would never suggest the use of Listerine unless it is to be washed off your teeth with ACT rinse. Most dentists are new to the idea of using multiple rinses in such a system of care. It is OK to dilute the Listerine if you want to just make sure to rinse with ACT after. Do you use Closys? Closys will really help to protect your teeth before brushing and improve your gum condition. Make sure you use only Crest Original Toothpaste many other pastes are too abrasive for your gum health.

Hope this answers your questions,

Ellie
26 Corporate Woods
Rochester, NY 14623

2 comments:

Anonymous said...

Xylimelt mentioned some bacteria may become resistant to xylitol. I have such hopes for your system but have you heard of this happening? Just wondering. Thanks for your time.
R

Dr. Ellie said...

No there is no development of "resistance" - research in counties that have used xylitol for decades, shows this does not happen with xylitol.

However - research shows that bacteria DO learn how to adapt to SORBITOL.

Perhaps this is where the confusion exists!!

Strep mutans quickly adapt to sorbitol - by your third piece of gum - and they learn to use sorbitol to grow and multiply.
People who eat sorbitol-containing gum, despite the fact it is sugarless, often have gum disease and acid reflux symptoms in addition.

I would like to mention that artificial sweeteners, especially sorbitol have also been shown TO BLOCK the benefits of xylitol.
(It is therefore incredible that the ADA endorsed chewing gum which is a mix of sorbitol and xylitol. This has been heavily promoted to dentistry.
No wonder many dentists think xylitol is not worth using - but they are not recommending 100 PERCENT xylitol products.)

Be informed and beware of sorbitol!!!
Young mothers - watch out that for kiddie toothpaste - many sugar fee products are "sweetened" with sorbitol!!!

Maybe what they meant was that if you continue to use xylitol, a new kind of bacteria will take over from the harmful kind that will disappear.
This new replacement kind of bacteria does not produce acids and does not form sticky plaque.
This is healthy bacteria that will cover your teeth and protect them from damage when you eat or drink.
What happens in scientific terms is that you "develop a healthy oral ecology".

One reason I do not recommend baking soda, is that it wipes out, not only bad bacteria but also healthy good ones.
You cannot "clean" away all bacteria for health - you need to work to have healthy ones.
This is the same for your gut, skin and eyes etc....which is why people are learning about the benefits of Probiotics.
As someone once corrected me: xylitol is not a probiotic but could be classified as a Pre-biotic. It removes the kind of bacteria you DON'T want and allows the good kind to take over. This is why taking probiotics and xylitol at the same time works very well!


Hope this helps to explain the confusion!
Ellie

www.zellies.com
26 Corporate Woods
Rochester, NY 14623
(585) 272-1270

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